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Breeze
June 18th, 2002, 09:36 AM
I installed my first the other day. The float part will pull out of T for easy cleaning. It comes ready for 1" PVC and adapters to fit 3/4" PVC. They are not cheap but having to file a claim on your insur. isn't either.

CECIL1
June 19th, 2002, 07:15 AM
Keep us posted, if you can remeber it. I have not used that type , due to mineral content of water in this area.

Know it is condensed water, but it still eats a lot of metal, if it gets in the secondardy pan.

Breeze
June 19th, 2002, 07:32 AM
There was only one left of the type I need. Someone bought them all out (so he thought) on monday. I found one hiding behind the SS2 models. This is one very versatile safety switch. The float is a type of plastic, I will check specs to see what it really is. I don't see any metal that the water can touch.
Edit: OK its a magnetic switch so everything that water could touch is sealed and a type of plastic. This one switch can be used for aux drains too ... it comes with a plug for that application.

Their main site is www.smdresearch.com

The ss1 is here: www.smdresearch.com/products/SafeTSwitch/safetswitchss1.shtml

Pegleg Smith
June 19th, 2002, 09:41 AM
I seem to recall that Alltemp posted something about these floats before I permanently left the other site. I have a couple of them on my truck. They are most useful in attic installations but I guess they would be good anywhere.

Breeze
June 19th, 2002, 09:58 AM
He may have but I usually skim his posts, its just too hard to make out what he is saying.
I am about to install one on this coil change I am doing today. I think its a plus when you can keep water from going through sheetrock or if they have wood floors.

RoBoTeq
June 19th, 2002, 08:29 PM
In trying to get our distribution company to stock the Safe-T switch I had our engineering department look it over. The conclusion was that the switch may not hold up under load. We have gone to the EZ-Trap instead.

Breeze
June 19th, 2002, 09:18 PM
The GOOD-MEN at Janitrol have time to do R & D on someone elses product ... when they should be checking out their own?

Oh wait a minute, I see now, they were thinking what would happen if it was installed on their unit ... I have to agree there, a LOAD of SHIT would mess this switch up.

RoBoTeq
June 19th, 2002, 09:35 PM
R & D? Is that Ripoff & Do-cheaper?

We tested the amp rating against our components amp draw. I believe it failed on the AH which has a circulator pump for a hot water coil in it that also takes out thermostat heat anticipators if they are not set high enough.

Breeze
June 19th, 2002, 10:27 PM
The device is for cutting out contactor (outdoor unit) not a/h. It is UL approved.

Pegleg Smith
June 19th, 2002, 11:01 PM
I have a customer that probably wishes he had one of these safety switches installed. Attic install and the unit has been draining from the emergency drain for some time now. That drain finally plugged up too. Beautiful house full of expensive furniture and floor coverings. Big, ugly, dirty brown wet spot in the middle of the master bedroom and another ugly stain on the ceiling. It's really a shame he didn't realize that the unit was not supposed to drain from the pipe over his window. I bet if those switches were available at the time he would have one on each of his units.
They are wired into the condenser control voltage circuit. This will let the fan circulate air but there won't be any cooling and this should quickly alert the home owner of a problem.
Simple and sure protection for a modest price. :D

RoBoTeq
June 19th, 2002, 11:16 PM
Many techs use cutoff switches to break the red wire to the t-stat so it is more apparent that something is wrong when the fan doesn't even turn on.

Pegleg Smith
June 19th, 2002, 11:43 PM
Originally posted by Robin Boyd
Many techs use cutoff switches to break the red wire to the t-stat so it is more apparent that something is wrong when the fan doesn't even turn on.

Well, golly yes, Beaver. That way it is instantly apparant that SOMETHING has gone wrong! I think you and Wally should go hang out at the soda shop. OK?;)

I also read in the Western HVACR News that the EZ trap is UL registered not listed which means, I beleive, it hasn't received final approval yet. The Safe t switch is UL listed.

Charlie
June 20th, 2002, 03:54 PM
Originally posted by Robin Boyd
Many techs use cutoff switches to break the red wire to the t-stat so it is more apparent that something is wrong when the fan doesn't even turn on.

That's the way I do it. It really gets the homeowners attention.

Rayr
June 20th, 2002, 04:14 PM
Originally posted by Charlie


That's the way I do it. It really gets the homeowners attention.


ME TO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Breeze
June 20th, 2002, 05:10 PM
...butt breaking red could result in a "no heat" call if switch malfuntioned.
Any way, this switch is half the cost of eztrap. I do agree that the wire size is a bit small and I will ask them to increase the size cuz everyone listens to me. :D

RoBoTeq
June 20th, 2002, 05:24 PM
Don't get me wrong, I really like the Safe-T switch. I tried to get us to put a number in our system for it to be stocked by any of our ADI branches.

Evidently our purchaser also tried to get it in, but with the amp rating concern he was more comfy with the EZ-Trap.

The Safe-T switch rep has been real good with getting me samples of his procucts and I am still trying to get other items in our stock.

So what are you saying Peg? I have an uncanny grasp of the obvious?

Breeze
June 20th, 2002, 06:01 PM
SPECIFICATIONS: 24 Volts A/C, 1 Amp. Schedule 40 PVC Slip Fittings Accept 3/4-inch Stub or Drain Line.

Since it is rated at 1 amp you can't use this switch to break RED but breaking yellow should be less than an amp. I usally get under .7 amps on most contactors.

Mr.BagTek
June 21st, 2002, 04:03 PM
I dont like float swithes. I usually run a seperate pvc line from the overflow pan to a hole in the ceiling over the bed in the master bedroom. That way if they re sleeping, it wakes them up. If they re not home, the bed acts like a giant sponge and the house stays cool. Mike.

Pegleg Smith
June 21st, 2002, 10:47 PM
Gives new meaning to the phrase "throw cold water on them!" :D funny stuff!

lynn rodenmayer
July 19th, 2002, 09:40 PM
I like breaking the two wire. If one breaks the R wire and the electronic stats batteries are low won't one have to reprogram the stat.

Breeze
July 19th, 2002, 09:51 PM
Plus the one I am using has a 1 amp rating, wouldn't want that on the whole system (like say a heat pump).

Another "what if", say the switch messes up some how and now the heater won't work? Its 32° out ...

Charlie
July 20th, 2002, 10:03 AM
Originally posted by Newtek
I dont like float swithes. I usually run a seperate pvc line from the overflow pan to a hole in the ceiling over the bed in the master bedroom. That way if they re sleeping, it wakes them up. If they re not home, the bed acts like a giant sponge and the house stays cool. Mike.

ROTFLMAO: Somehow Mike, I believe you!:D :D :D :D :D :D

RJ45
August 16th, 2002, 08:01 AM
Re Robin's note:

Safe-T-Switch Model SS1 and SS2 products have been retested and re-rated by Underwriters Laboratories® as of August 7, 2002. The new rating for the products is 24 volts A/C, 1.25 Amps GP. The products were tested for 6000 cycles with an inductive load.

Separately, the reed used in the products is a UL® Recognized Component rated at 2.5 Amps Max Carry Current.

Prior to the above date, the products were rated for Pilot Duty which requires a 10 fold inrush current be applied during testing. This meant that, for example, a rating of 1.25 amps would require a 12.5 amp current be applied for a portion of each cycle during testing. At the time of that testing, we were unaware of GP ratings, were hesitant to test at this 10 fold inrush amperage and therefore settled for 50 mAmps meaning 0.5 amps was applied during the testing.

Without a doubt it will hold up in a 24 volt thermostat circuit.

The plastic in the is a hard polypropylene with a resin coating that will not corrode in or break down in hard water. It is also resistant to build up.

The EZ Trap product must be wired twice - once at the installation site and again at the other end of the wire. The switch component and wiring conections are exposed to moisture (not sealed). This can cause it to corrode and fail, to short or ground out burning the tranformer and pose a shock risk to homeowners.

visit www.smdresearch.com (http://www.smdresearch.com) for detail.

Breeze
August 16th, 2002, 08:52 AM
I am wondering how you found us ... my first guess is you have been monitoring your log files and wondered who the heck is Talk-air.com ?

If you happen to work for www.smdresearch.com then thanks for setting us straight on your product.

I really like the SS1 but the wire is too small, other than that it is a great product that I now offer all my customers.

RJ45
August 16th, 2002, 10:41 AM
Breeze - Yes I noted in our webstats that we were getting hits from this domain. NICE BOARD! I am w/ SMD & plan on adding this site to the links section of our website.

We were getting complaints about the wire size so we changed to a heavier gauge a several months ago because it is easier to install. The "baby grey" wirenuts work good.

Regards

Breeze
August 16th, 2002, 12:02 PM
Now if you will just ship out a case of those babies to everyone on the board :D

So what do you all suggest as to the wiring of this switch:

A. cut out compressor only
B. break red +24vac
C. break common

I didn't read the instructions.

RJ45
August 16th, 2002, 12:55 PM
U mean after all the hours I put in on those instructions you didn't study them carefully prior to installing???!!! ;) U guys (my partner included) are all the same.

From feedback out in the field more and more they interrupt yellow to cut the condensor & keep the fan going. It's been suggested that this helps keep mold down during long asences (like when the snowbirds down here in FL flock north in the spring). Plus like you and Lynn note there are fewer components drawing on the cooling ckt so less potential for problems. I do it this way in my house and rental properties but I'm not a tech.

Although, as someone pointed out earlier in the thread cutting the fan will alert the homeowner sooner that something is amiss. Typically the customer will call either way when a clog occurs but at least he won't be PO'd standing in a pool of water when you get out there. Usually after a flood, all you have to do is show it to them and they want it.

We have it either way in the instructions.

The SS2 model fits nicely (smaller) on the primary pan, auxiliary outlet, is preplugged, less money and catches more clogs like when the primary outlet nipple clogs above the (inline) switch - see photo. U can also install it on the alternate primary drain outlets on AH's that have a knockout on either side.

Sorry but the bean counters cut off my supply of samples.

Breeze
August 16th, 2002, 01:13 PM
Installed as close as possible to drain outlet. I always break compressor circuit. The last thing I want is a NO HEAT call at 2am sun. morning. As for instructions, I figured, "how hard can it be".

RoBoTeq
August 16th, 2002, 02:46 PM
Pardon my capatolistic approach, but a no heat call is still a call. Isn't that what service techs make money on, calls?

Break the hot lead to the t-stat. That way the customer won't do any harm fiddling with the stat because the fan is running but it is not getting any cooler.

I had never had a switch of any sort go bad other than in the summer when they had water in the drain system somewhere. What exactly would make it go bad in the winter?

RoBoTeq
August 16th, 2002, 02:48 PM
Glad to hear the rating has been increased. I will definetly see about getting them in our system.

Breeze
August 16th, 2002, 03:43 PM
More often Robin and no I do not mean that field. System stuck in a defrost, customer playing with the switch, cat peeing on the coil ... you know the usual.